Langue française

  • American psycho Nouv.

    American psycho

    Bret Easton Ellis

    A cult classic, adapted into a film starring Christian Bale. Is evil something you are? Or is it something you do? Patrick Bateman has it all: good looks, youth, charm, a job on Wall Street, reservations at every new restaurant in town and a line of girls around the block. He is also a psychopath. A man addicted to his superficial, perfect life, he pulls us into a dark underworld where the American Dream becomes a nightmare . . . With an introduction by Irvine Welsh, Bret Easton Ellis''s American Psycho is one of the most controversial and talked-about novels of all time. A multi-million -copy bestseller hailed as a modern classic, it is a violent black comedy about the darkest side of human nature.

  • White

    Bret Easton Ellis

    Bret Easton Ellis is most famous for his era-defining novel American Psycho and its terrifying anti-hero, Patrick Bateman. With that book, and many times since, Ellis proved himself to be one of the world's most fearless and clear-sighted observers of society - the glittering surface and the darkness beneath.In White, his first work of non-fiction, Ellis offers a wide-ranging exploration of what the hell is going on right now. He tells personal stories from his own life. He writes with razor-sharp precision about the music, movies, books and TV he loves and hates. He examines the ways our culture, politics and relationships have changed over the last four decades. He talks about social media, Hollywood celebrities and Donald Trump. Ellis considers conflicting positions without flinching and adheres to no status quo. His forthright views are powered by a fervent belief in artistic freedom and freedom of speech. Candid, funny, entertaining and blisteringly honest, he offers opinions that are impossible to ignore and certain to provoke. What he values above all is the truth. 'The culture at large seemed to encourage discourse,' he writes, 'but what it really wanted to do was shut down the individual.' Bret Easton Ellis will not be shut down.

  • Station eleven Nouv.

    Station eleven

    Emily St. John Mandel

    ''Best novel. The big one . . . stands above all the others . . . beautifully written, and wonderfully elegiac, a book that I will long remember, and return to.'' - George R.R. Martin, author of Game of Thrones . The New York Times Bestseller Winner of the Arthur C. Clarke Award Longlisted for the Baileys Women''s Prize for Fiction National Book Awards Finalist PEN/Faulkner Award Finalist Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel is a bold vision of a dystopian future, frighteningly real, perfect for fans of Margaret Atwood''s The Handmaid''s Tale. What was lost in the collapse: almost everything, almost everyone, but there is still such beauty. One snowy night in Toronto famous actor Arthur Leander dies on stage whilst performing the role of a lifetime. That same evening a deadly virus touches down in North America. The world will never be the same again. Twenty years later Kirsten, an actress in the Travelling Symphony, performs Shakespeare in the settlements that have grown up since the collapse. But then her newly hopeful world is threatened. If civilization was lost, what would you preserve? And how far would you go to protect it?

  • THE GLASS HOTEL

    Emily St. John Mandel

    The New York Times bestselling novel, from the author of Station Eleven . ''A damn fine novel . . . haunting and evocative and immersive'' George R. R. Martin Vincent is the beautiful bartender at the Hotel Caiette, a five-star glass-and-cedar palace on the northernmost tip of Vancouver Island. New York financier Jonathan Alkaitis owns the hotel. When he passes Vincent his card with a tip, it''s the beginning of their life together. That same day, a hooded figure scrawls a note on the windowed wall of the hotel: ''Why don''t you swallow broken glass.'' Leon Prevant, a shipping executive for a company called Neptune-Avramidis, sees the note from the hotel bar and is shaken to his core. Thirteen years later Vincent mysteriously disappears from the deck of a Neptune-Avramidis ship. Weaving together the lives of these characters, Emily St. John Mandel''s The Glass Hotel moves between the ship, the towers of Manhattan and the wilderness of remote British Columbia, painting a breathtaking picture of greed and guilt, fantasy and delusion, art and the ghosts of our pasts.

  • Room Nouv.

    Room

    Emma Donoghue

    Jack is five. He lives with his Ma. They live in a single, locked room. They don''t have the key. Jack and Ma are prisoners. '' Room is a book to read in one sitting. When it''s over you look up: the world looks the same but you are somehow different and that feeling lingers for days'' Audrey Niffenegger ''One of the most profoundly affecting books I''ve read in a long time'' John Boyne ''Such incredible imagination, and dazzling use of language . . . Room is unlike anything I''ve ever read before'' Anita Shreve '' Room is that rarest of entities, an entirely original work of art. I mean it as the highest possible praise when I tell you that I can''t compare it to any other book. Suffice to say that it''s potent, darkly beautiful, and revelatory'' Michael Cunningham

  • The Sunday Times Bestseller and BBC Radio 2 Book Club Pick 2020 For readers of Circe and The Handmaid''s Tale , Kiran Millwood Hargrave''s The Mercies is a story about how suspicion can twist its way through a community, and about a love that could prove as dangerous as it is powerful. Winter, 1617. The sea around the remote Norwegian island of Vardo is thrown into a reckless storm. A young woman, Maren, watches as the men of the island, out fishing, perish in an instant. Vardo is now a place of women. Eighteen months later, a sinister figure arrives. Summoned from Scotland to take control of a place at the edge of the civilized world, Absalom Cornet knows what he needs to do to bring the women of the island to heel. With him travels his young wife, Ursa. In her new home, and in Maren, Ursa finds something she has never seen before: independent women. But Absalom sees only a place flooded with a terrible evil, one he must root out at all costs . . . ''Beautiful and chilling'' Madeline Miller, author of Circe ''Took my breath away'' Tracy Chevalier, author of Girl with a Pearl Earring

  • PARADISE

    Kae Tempest

    Lyricist, novelist, poet and playwright Kate Tempest will make her National Theatre debut in June with Paradise , a potent and dynamic reimagining of the Greek classic Philoctetes by Sophocles. Once comrades, now enemies after Odysseus abandoned Philoctetes to suffer a terrible wound alone, Odysseus is prepared to use any means necessary to get the shell-shocked Philoctetes back to the front and win the Trojan war. Directed by Ian Rickson with Lesley Sharp leading a large ensemble all woman cast.

  • AMNESTY

    Aravind Adiga

    Danny - Dhananjaya Rajaratnam - is an undocumented immigrant in Sydney, denied refugee status after he has fled from his native Sri Lanka. Working as a cleaner, living out of a grocery storeroom, for three years he's been trying to create a new identity for himself. And now, with his beloved vegan girlfriend, Sonja, with his hidden accent and highlights in his hair, he is as close as he has ever come to living a normal Australian life.But then one morning, Danny learns a female client of his has been murdered. When Danny recognizes a jacket left at the murder scene, he believes it belongs to another of his clients -- a doctor with whom he knows the woman was having an affair. Suddenly Danny is confronted with a choice: come forward with his knowledge about the crime and risk being deported, or say nothing, and let justice go undone? Over the course of a single day, evaluating the weight of his past, his dreams for the future, and the unpredictable, often absurd reality of living invisibly and undocumented, he must wrestle with his conscience and decide if a person without rights still has responsibilities.Propulsive, insightful, and full of Aravind Adiga's signature wit and magic, Amnesty is both a timeless moral struggle and a universal story with particular urgency today.

  • 1940s Oxford: two young men meet at university. Both know that they only have a year left of their studies, and possibly their lives, before theyre forced to join the military. The novel follows the two through the generations to 2010 as well as a painting which disappears but is then rediscovered. As good as the English novel gets. Almost every sentence is a thing of beauty Sunday Telegraph.

  • B>With an introduction by novelist Ottessa Moshfegh/b>Eighteen-year-old college student Clay is back in his hometown of Los Angeles for Christmas break. Clay is three things: rich, bored and looking to get high. As he reacquaints himself with a familiarly limitless world of privilege, along with his best friend and his ex, his shocking, stunning and disturbing adventure is filled with non-stop drinking in glamorous nightclubs, drug-fuelled parties, and endless sexual encounters.Published in 1985, when Bret Easton Ellis was just twenty-one, Less Than Zero is a fierce coming-of-age story which quickly defined a genre. A cult classic beloved for its dogged portrayal of hedonistic youth and the morally depraved, this extraordinary and instantly famous novel is a landmark in modern fiction: an inventive, precocious and invigorating story of getting what you want when you want it.

  • SAINT X

    Alexis Schaitkin

    Saint X is a deeply moving story that hurtles to a devastating end. Claire is seven when her older sister Alison vanishes from the luxury resort on the Caribbean island of Saint X on the last night of her familys vacation. Years later, riding in a taxicab, Claire recognizes her driver as one of the men suspected of murdering her sister. The encounter sets her on an obsessive pursuit of the truth.

  • From the bestselling author of The Cazalet Chronicles, The Sea Change is a witty yet heart-rending story of a marriage in crisis.Emmanuel is a famous playwright. Lillian is his sickly and embittered wife. They have never fully buried the memory of their dead daughter, Sarah. Rich but discontented, they flit from capital to capital in the company of their hero-worshipping young manager.Then Alberta, straight from an English vicarage and the pages of Jane Austen, is appointed as Emmanuel's secretary. This prim and utterly delightful figure helps the family in ways they didn't know they needed. One by one the leopards change their spots . . .

  • A LITTLE LIFE Nouv.

    A LITTLE LIFE

    Hanya Yanagihara

    Shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2015. Shortlisted for the Baileys Prize for Women''s Fiction 2016. Finalist for the National Book Awards 2015. The million copy bestseller, A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara, is an immensely powerful and heartbreaking novel of brotherly love and the limits of human endurance. When four graduates from a small Massachusetts college move to New York to make their way, they''re broke, adrift, and buoyed only by their friendship and ambition. There is kind, handsome Willem, an aspiring actor; JB, a quick-witted, sometimes cruel Brooklyn-born painter seeking entry to the art world; Malcolm, a frustrated architect at a prominent firm; and withdrawn, brilliant, enigmatic Jude, who serves as their centre of gravity. Over the decades, their relationships deepen and darken, tinged by addiction, success, and pride. Yet their greatest challenge, each comes to realize, is Jude himself, by midlife a terrifyingly talented litigator yet an increasingly broken man, his mind and body scarred by an unspeakable childhood, and haunted by what he fears is a degree of trauma that he''ll not only be unable to overcome - but that will define his life forever.

  • HEAVEN

    Mieko Kawakami

    ''Mieko Kawakami is always ceaselessly growing and evolving.'' Haruki Murakami, author of The Wind-Up Bird Chronicles Told through the eyes of a 14 year-old boy subjected to relentless bullying, this is a haunting novel of the threat of violence that can stalk our teenage years. Instead of putting up resistance, the boy suffers in complete resignation. His sole friend is a female classmate suffering a similar treatment at the hands of bullies at the school. They meet in secret in the hopes of avoiding any further attention but their relationship has not gone unnoticed. One day the two are drawn to a deserted park and unwittingly walk straight into the hands of their tormentors. Kawakami''s deceptively simple yet profound work stands as a testament to her remarkable literary talent. Here she asks us to question the fate of the meek in a society that favours the strong, and the lengths that even children will go in their learned cruelty. Perfect for fans of edouard Louis or Yoko Ogawa.

  • WHITE NOISE Nouv.

    WHITE NOISE

    Don Delillo

    Jack Gladney is the creator and chairman of Hitler studies at the College-on-the-Hill. This is the story of his absurd life; a life that is going well enough, until a chemical spill from a rail car releases an ''Airborne Toxic Event'' and Jack is forced to confront his biggest fear - his own mortality. White Noise is an effortless combination of social satire and metaphysical dilemma in which Don DeLillo exposes our rampant consumerism, media saturation and novelty intellectualism. It captures the particular strangeness of life lived when the fear of death cannot be denied, repressed or obscured and ponders the role of the family in a time when the very meaning of our existence is under threat. ''America''s greatest living writer.'' - Observer

  • BLOOD MERIDIAN Nouv.

    BLOOD MERIDIAN

    Cormac Mccarthy

    With an introduction by Philipp Meyer The wrath of God lies sleeping. It was hid a million years before men were and only men have power to wake it. Hell aint half full. Set in the anarchic world opened up by America''s westward expansion, Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy is an epic and potent account of the barbarous violence that man visits upon man. Through the hostile landscape of the Texas-Mexico border wanders the Kid, a fourteen year-old Tennessean who is quickly swept-up in the relentless tide of blood. But the apparent chaos is not without its order: while Americans hunt Indians - collecting scalps as their bloody trophies - they too are stalked as prey. Since its first publication in 1985, Blood Meridian has been read as both a brilliant subversion of the Western novel and a blazing example of that form. Powerful and savagely beautiful, it has emerged as one of the most important works in American fiction of the last century. A truly mesmerising classic. ''A bloody and starkly beautiful tale'' Sunday Times ''Unlike anything I have read in recent years, an extraordinary, breathtaking achievement'' John Banville

  • The New York Times Bestseller ''A taut, sharp, funny book about being young now. It''s brutal - and brilliant.'' Zadie Smith, author of Swing Time ''Remarkable, the most delicious novel I''ve read.'' Candice Carty-Williams, author of Queenie ''I was blown away by this debut novel . . . It is exquisite.'' Dolly Alderton, author of Ghosts Edie is just trying to survive. She''s messing up in her dead-end admin job in her all-white office, is sleeping with all the wrong men, and has failed at the only thing that meant anything to her, painting. No one seems to care that she doesn''t really know what she''s doing with her life beyond looking for her next hook-up. And then she meets Eric, a white, middle-aged archivist with a suburban family, including a wife who has sort-of-agreed to an open marriage and an adopted black daughter who doesn''t have a single person in her life who can show her how to do her hair. As if navigating the constantly shifting landscape of sexual and racial politics as a young black woman wasn''t already hard enough, with nowhere else left to go, Edie finds herself falling head-first into Eric''s home and family. Razor sharp, provocatively page-turning and surprisingly tender, Luster by Raven Leilani is a painfully funny debut about what it means to be young now.

  • B>The chance to join /b>b>'the Revival of the Great Lucia Berlin' (New York Times)/b>From the author of A Manual for Cleaning Women.Ranging from Texas, to Chile, to New Mexico and New York, in Evening in Paradise Berlin writes about the good, the bad and everything in between: struggling young mothers, husbands who pack their bags and leave in the middle of the night, wives looking back at their first marriage from the distance of their second . . .The publication of A Manual for Cleaning Women, Lucia Berlin's dazzling collection of short stories, marked the rediscovery of a writer whose talent had gone unremarked by many. The incredible reaction to Lucia's writing - her ability to capture the beauty and ugliness that coexist in everyday lives, the extraordinary honesty and magnetism with which she draws on her own history to breathe life into her characters - included calls for her contribution to American literature to be as celebrated as that of Raymond Carver.Evening in Paradise is a careful selection from Lucia Berlin's remaining stories - a jewel-box follow-up for her hungry fans.

  • B>The New York Times bestseller /b>b>'This selection of 43 stories should by all rights see Lucia Berlin as lauded as Jean Rhys or Raymond Carver' - Independent/b>The stories in A Manual for Cleaning Women make for one of the most remarkable unsung collections in twentieth-century American fiction.With extraordinary honesty and magnetism, Lucia Berlin invites us into her rich, itinerant life: the drink and the mess and the pain and the beauty and the moments of surprise and of grace. Her voice is uniquely witty, anarchic and compassionate. Celebrated for many years by those in the know, she is about to become - a decade after her death - the writer everyone is talking about. The collection will be introduced by Lydia Davis.'With Lucia Berlin we are very far away from the parlours of Boston and New York and quite far away, too, from the fiction of manners, unless we are speaking of very bad manners . . . The writer Lucia Berlin most puts me in mind of is the late Richard Yates.' - LRB, 1999

  • @00000400@@00000327@'Evocative . . . poignant . . . acute and funny' @00000373@Observer@00000155@@00000133@@00000341@@00000327@@00000133@@00000341@@00000327@'The Revival of the Great Lucia Berlin Continues Apace' @00000373@New York Times@00000155@@00000133@@00000163@@00000400@Best known for her short fiction, it was upon publication of@00000373@ A Manual for Cleaning Women@00000155@ in 2015 that Lucia Berlin's status as a great American writer was widely celebrated. To populate her stories - the places, relationships, the sentiments - Berlin often drew on her own rich, itinerant life. @00000163@@00000400@Before Berlin died, she was working on a book of previously unpublished autobiographical sketches called @00000373@Welcome Home@00000155@. The work consisted of more than twenty chapters that started in 1936 in Alaska and ended (prematurely) in 1966 in southern Mexico. In our publication of @00000373@Welcome Home@00000155@, her son Jeff Berlin is filling in the gaps with photos and letters from her eventful, romantic, and tragic life.@00000163@@00000400@From Alaska to Argentina, Kentucky to Mexico, New York City to Chile, Berlin's world was wide. And the writing here is, as we've come to expect, dazzling. She describes the places she lived and the people she knew with all the style and wit and heart and humour that readers fell in love with in her stories.@00000163@

  • THE LONG TAKE

    Robin Robertson

    B>Shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2018/b>b>Winner of the Goldsmiths Prize 2018/b>b>Winner of The Roehampton Poetry Prize 2018 /b>b>Winner of the 2019 Walter Scott Prize for Historical Fiction/b>b>'A beautiful, vigorous and achingly melancholy hymn to the common man that is as unexpected as it is daring.' --John Banville, Guardian/b>A noir narrative written with the intensity and power of poetry, The Long Take is one of the most remarkable - and unclassifiable - books of recent years. Walker is a D-Day veteran with post-traumatic stress disorder; he can't return home to rural Nova Scotia, and looks instead to the city for freedom, anonymity and repair. As he moves from New York to Los Angeles and San Francisco we witness a crucial period of fracture in American history, one that also allowed film noir to flourish. The Dream had gone sour but - as those dark, classic movies made clear - the country needed outsiders to study and dramatise its new anxieties. While Walker tries to piece his life together, America is beginning to come apart: deeply paranoid, doubting its own certainties, riven by social and racial division, spiralling corruption and the collapse of the inner cities. The Long Take is about a good man, brutalised by war, haunted by violence and apparently doomed to return to it - yet resolved to find kindness again, in the world and in himself.Robin Robertson's The Long Take is a work of thrilling originality.

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